Jackie Silberg | Miss Jackie Music Company

 


Early childhood books and music for babies, toddlers, preschool and kindergarten from Jackie Silberg... "Miss Jackie!"


Home
About Jackie
Jackie Facts
Who's Singing?
Contact Jackie
Workshops
Products
Books
CDs and DVDs
MP3s
Backlisted Items
Lyrics
Find a Song
Alphabetical List
Discography
Articles
Current Articles
Past Articles
Find Inspiration
Special Events
More Resources



Early Childhood Education ~ Articles by Jackie Silberg

This section features articles by Jackie Silberg discussing various child development issues. If you would like to copy any of these articles to pass out to parents, in a newsletter or a class, or if you would like to obtain other similar articles, please email Jackie for the details at jsilberg@interserv.com Thanks!

Previous Articles by Jackie Silberg:

If Your Name...
Creative Dramatics Help Children Communicate
Ten Laughing and Having Fun Games for Toddlers and Twos

Five Minute Games that Develop Imagination
Music About Animals and Insects
Eight, Great Movement Activities
Three Bears with a Beat
Child-Building: Brain Games for Babies
Ten Ways to Teach a Song


Have Fun as You Develop Listening Skills

by Jackie Silberg

Recognizing sound differences is important in a young child’s development. It paves the way for clarity of speech and for listening ability. But, like anything else, it must be taught.

Learning should be fun! I’ve found that the more fun that can be introduced into the learning process, the more the children learn. After all, “A spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down.” I’m going to share with you some of the games I’ve developed over the years to aid in listening and auditory discrimination.

Put three objects on a table—for example, a block, a book, and a ball. (It’s a good idea to use objects that start with the same sound.) Select three children to come to the table, each picking one of the objects. Now ask, “Where is the block?” The child who has the block answers, “Here is the block.” Ask, “Where is the book?” The child who has the book answers, “Here is the book,” and so on. After you have practiced this a few times…the game can begin.

Ask the questions in different tones; the child answers in the same tone. Some different ways to ask the question are:

Loud voice Whisper Nasal voice
Soft voice Gruff voice Fast
Sweet voice Slowly Loud and soft

The children will really get into this game and will think of other ways to change their voices.

Another game I use is so much fun that children ask to play it. This is one of the best listening skill developers I have ever known. You must listen discriminately.

Choose two children to come up to the front of the class. Ask them to turn around so the class does not see their faces.

Each of the two children is to think of an animal sound, but not tell anyone what their sound is. At the signal—a musical one—the children begin to make their animal sounds over and over until the signal says stop. (They will be making their sounds simultaneously.) The children in the class listen and tell what sounds they hear.

When the class identifies the animal, that child sits down and another child gets to make animal sounds.

After this has been played several times with two children, you can increase it to three—and eventually four—sounds. Sometimes the children will make the same sound, other times they will make different sounds. This is all right, because we want to let them choose their own sounds.

You can vary this game with sounds of transportation—cars, airplanes, fire engines, trains, motorcycles, etc. This is very popular, and you usually have a lot of fire engines in class.

Another variation is having one of the children whose back is turned sing a song; the class must identify which child is singing. You can also switch the roles and let one of the children in the class sing a song and the children in the front of the class have to identify who is singing.

After you’ve played these games a few times, you’ll develop your own variations. We’d love to hear about them—write us and tell us what you and the children come up with!

early childhood books by jackie silberg

If your name...

by Jackie Silberg
Sing to the tune of “If you’re Happy and you know it.”

If your name starts with A clap your hands – clap clap
If your name starts with B – clap your hands – clap clap
If your name starts with C or D or E you can jump up and down and clap your hands. – clap clap

If your name starts with F – tap your foot – tap tap
If your name starts with G – tap your foot – tap tap
If your name starts with H or I or J – you can jump up and down and tap your foot – tap tap

If your name starts with K – blink your eyes – blink blink
If your name starts with L – blink your eyes – blink blink
If your name starts with M or N or O – you can jump up and down and blink your eyes – blink blink

If your name starts with P shake your head – shake shake
If your name starts with Q shake your head – shake shake
If your name starts with R or S or T you can jump up and down and shake your head – shake shake

If your name starts with U – throw a kiss
If your name starts with V – throw a kiss
If your name starts with W or X, Y, Z you can jump up and down and throw a kiss. – kiss kiss,


 


©Copyright 2011 Miss Jackie Music Company/Jackie Silberg